Titles of accepted proposals for CSSR 2017

Our peer review of proposals is now complete. Here is a list of titles of presentation proposals accepted for the CSSR/SCÉR 2017 conference. Hopefully this interesting set of titles will entice others to attend our conference in Toronto, ON, May 30-June 1, 2017.

In alphabetical order:

•    A neurocognitive ontology of rhetorical figures
•    Apartheid Legal Screens and Nelson Mandela’s Luminescence
•    Cautiously Optimistic: Imagining a Multicultural Canada in 1941
•    Communication across lay/expert divides: A rhetorical decision-making framework
•    From persuasion to presumption to standards and surveillance: Rhetorical mechanisms in the promotion of surgical checklists
•    From Usability to UX: Visual Rhetoric, Comics, and Technical Communication
•    Hidden in Plain Sight: Memory, Fake News and the Rhetoric of Ignorance
•    How to Survive Food-pocalypse: The Politics of Food Resilience Narratives
•    Hyperreal Gentrification in Istanbul
•    Identification Strategies in China’s National-Image Discourse Construction
•    Laughing Stocks: Prison, Surplus, Comic Relief
•    Les usages de l’ekphrasis / The uses of ekphrasis
•    “Liberals Lead:” The Rhetorical Influence of CBC’s Aggregate Polling Data on Voters in the 2015 Canadian National Election
•    Occupy Wall Street, C.S. Peirce’s Theory of Rhetoric, and the Right to the Commons
•    “On Earth as it is in Heaven”: Transitive Action in The Lord’s Prayer
•    Pierre Elliott Trudeau’s Pirouette as Canadian Ideograph
•    Publicly Anonymous: Ethical Rhetorical Analysis Online
•    Reimagining the Political: Weaving Aesthetics & Sensation in Communication & Rhetoric Theory
•    Resonance Chambers & Industrial Nightmares: Big Wind’s Rhetorical Afflictions
•    Re-turning the Rhetorical Turn to Narrative Practice
•    Rhetoric And/ Rhetoric of
•    Rhetoric Meets Structuralism at the École Pratique des Hautes Études
•    Rhétorique et divination : comment rendre le divin évident dans la Grèce classique ?
Rhetoric and divination: how to make the divine obvious in classical Greece?
•    The Context of Melmoth’s 1749 English Translation of Tacitus’ Dialogue on Oratory
•    The Meme is the Message: Subtervising through Self-Care Internet Memes
•    The Transformative Power of Rhetoric:  Speaking to Become the President or Prime Minister
•    Une rhétorique critique et inclusive. L’enseignement des questions rhétoriques à des professionnels se formant en éthique appliquée
•    Vico’s rhetorical angle: geometry, genealogy, and argumentative ingenuity
•    Viral Vaccines: Proposed Policy and the Rhetoric of Redditors Response

The DRAFT programme will be in developement after Feb. 27, by which time I hope to have received replies from proposers indicating whether they are planning to attend.

Keynote speakers’ presentations may be added to the programme at a later date.

Journal CFP: The Humanities as a Form of Resistance

The first issue of Con Texte, Laurentian University’s interdisciplinary humanities graduate student journal, will explore the various forms of text that ignite revolutionary forms of political and social resistance.

Works should reflect the ever present need for political resistance as expressed through the humanities and emphasize the role and importance of text as a means of pedagogy, revolution, and reformation.  When politics fall into dangerous and threatening forms, many of us have few alternatives for opposition.  This edition will explore the importance of text in maintaining our sense of the world, creating culture and national identity, and centring our communities within their own power.

We are looking for submissions exploring a wide range of topics, including but not limited to:

  • feminist literature, philosophy, and all other forms of text
  • explorations of intersectionality in terms of art, literature and philosophy
  • humour and satire as forms of political commentary
  • explorations of empowerment for community and culture through humanities methods
  • scholarly reflections on music, poetry and prose as forms of resistance

We invite submissions from scholars at all levels and seek a variety of theoretical positions, differing and silenced opinions, and strange perspectives about the value of the Humanities.

Full Submission Due: March 15th 2017
Maximum 3,500 words in Word format.
Citations in MLA, APA, and Chicago.
Prepared for blind review.
In English or French.
Online publication released June 1st 2017.

Please send your submission to contexte.journal@gmail.com.

More information available at contextejournal.ca

CFP: The Rhetoric of Platforms

The Rhetorics of Platforms: Special Issue CFP

[Announcement copied from the Present Tense Journal website.]

For this special issue of Present Tense: A Journal of Rhetoric in Society, we invite proposals that investigate, theorize, and/or analyze the rhetorical work of platforms. By platforms, we draw on Tarleton Gillespie to mean “sites and services that host public expression, store it on and serve it up from the cloud, organize access to it through search and recommendation, or install it onto mobile devices.” Platforms encapsulate a complex assemblage of cultural, political, ideological, and economic practices. We are interested in research and scholarship that untangles such assemblages—that is, work that examines the rhetorics of platforms. Continue reading CFP: The Rhetoric of Platforms

2017 CSSR Late proposals accepted until Jan. 21 (for members only)

Did you miss the deadline to submit your 2017 CSSR proposal?

It was Sunday, January 15th.

The good news is that we’ve got a wealth of proposals from new people! However, I am somewhat dismayed that some of our regulars haven’t submitted proposals.

Therefore, IF you are a currently paid CSSR member, OR you are a past paid CSSR member, and you would still like to submit a proposal for the 2017 conference,

  1. Please email me (Tania Smith) ASAP to declare your intention to submit a proposal. I would like to know how many are coming late so I can start preparing peer review now.
  2. I would be willing to receive your late proposal by end of day, Saturday, January 21 if you are a current paid member or a past member.  Consider this a bonus “membership benefit” this year!  See the 2017 conference page for information and the CFP.

I’m sorry we cannot afford an extended deadline of longer than 1 week for members. We must start reviewing right away. Several people who submitted proposals need early review results in order to obtain travel funding.

I also aim to give results in time for every presenter to register while Congress still offers a reduced “early bird” registration fee and to plan their accommodations before rooms are not sold out at conference hotels nearby.